Children Raised In LGBT Families Of Color Face Double Jeopardy

posted on Tue, Feb 28 2012 9:49 am by Sean Carlson, New Media Manager

Today, in partnership with The National Black Justice Coalition, National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance, UNID@S, the Fighting Injustice to Reach Equality (FIRE) initiative, the Movement Advancement Project and the Center for American Progress, we released a companion report to the All Children Matter Report - LGBT Families of Color: Facts at a Glance

The report offers a snapshot of how racial and ethnic discrimination, anti-LGBT social stigma and outdated family laws intersect to hurt children living in LGBT families of color.

Some key findings include:

  • LGBT families are more racially and ethnically diverse than families headed by married heterosexual couples. Of same-sex couples with children, 41% are people of color, compared to 34% of married different-sex couples with children.

  • LGBT families of color face greater poverty. For example, 32% of children raised by black same-sex couples live in poverty, compared to 13% of children raised by black married different-sex couples and 7% of children raised by white married different-sex couples.

The report offers concrete solutions to addressing these challenges:

  • Legally recognizing LGBT families of color via parental recognition laws at the state level; marriage for gay and lesbian couples; and pathways to immigration and citizenship for binational and immigrant LGBT families.
  • Providing LGBT families of color with equal access to government-based economic protections such as safety net programs. Consistent, broad definitions of family within these programs should include domestic partners and other de facto parents.
  • Providing LGBT families of color and their children with equal access to health care and health insurance, as well as medical decision-making ability.
  • Protecting LGBT families of color and their children with non-discrimination laws and anti-bullying policies.
  • Provide LGBT families of color with accessible and culturally competent programs, services and support.
blog comments powered by Disqus